With the commemoration of ANZAC Day approaching, the Passchendaele Museum zooms in on Australian efforts on the Western Front. Australian troops played a leading role during the Battle of Passchendaele. In the autumn of 1917, they took Polygon Wood and Zonnebeke and stormed the ridges at Broodseinde and Passchendaele. The latter proved to be a ridge too far. Australia paid a heavy price at Passchendaele. In less than a month, the Australians suffered over 38,000 casualties, of which about 10,000 were killed.

Australian soldiers during the Battle of Passchendaele, 1917. (Source: AWM)

 

In this lecture, Myriam Barale, Visitor Services Officer at the Sir John Monash Centre, follows Australian troops from the trenches of Armentiers and the Somme to the mud of Passchendaele and the Final Offensive. In the process, she highlights several unmissable sights and museums along the former front.

 

Pencil drawing of Australian soldiers by Will Dyson, the first Australian official war artist to visit the front in 1916-1917.

 

About Myriam Barale

Myriam Barale grew up in sun-drenched New South Wales moving to France in 1990. Bitten by the First World War, she moved to the rolling golden fields of the Somme in 2010. She is a seasoned battlefield guide and has guided countless tourists around the Australian battlefields in Flanders and Picardy. Since 2021, Myriam has worked for the Sir John Monash Centre, an interpretive centre located behind the Australian National Memorial near Villers-Bretonneux, commemorating the Australians who served on the Western Front and the soldiers who died in France and have no known grave.

 

 

 

Practical
  • Saturday 13 April 2024 at 2.15 PM
  • Research Centre, Ieperstraat 1, Zonnebeke
  • € 10.00 / person, including a drink

 

Register here